Cardiologists - In demand

It's a great time for cardiologists seeking new opportunities. W. Bruce Fye writes in the February 4, 2003 issue of Health Affairs:
The United States faces a serious shortage of cardiologists as our population ages and the burden of heart disease grows. The problem is compounded by a cutback in the number of cardiology training positions a decade ago. Dramatic scientific, technological, and procedural advances fueled the growth of cardiology during the second half of the twentieth century. Patients benefited from access to specialists who transformed new knowledge into longer and better lives. Demand for cardiologists is strong and growing.

The CDC's Summary Statistics for U.S. Adults, 2001 backs this up with statistics on the pervasiveness of heart related diagnoses:
  • Overall, 12% of adults 18 years of age and over had ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that they had heart disease, 6% had ever been told they had coronary heart disease, 21% had been told on two or more visits that they had hypertension, and 2% had ever been told they had experienced a stroke.
  • Among adults 18 years of age and over, men were more likely to have ever been told they had coronary heart disease than were women. Women were more likely to have ever been told on two or more visits that they had hypertension than were men.
Depending on your preferences, there is growing demand among areas seeing a rise in the elderly population (traditionally, states such as Florida, Arizona, and California) as well as in communities of white collar, middle aged workers who are more attuned to heart concerns and have the means to investigate symptoms.


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Updated April 12, 2004 - return to our list of medical specialties or river2u home